How did medicine survive FDA, progencell, stem cells, Tijuana

Those of us who practice on the forefront of medicine get tired of hearing advice like “Don’t trust any doctor whose treatments aren’t approved by the FDA” from bureaucrats and laymen. It’s not that we have anything against the FDA – we’re really natural allies in the advancement of medical practice because we give them discoveries that they turn into accepted procedures. What we do is the yin to the FDA’s yang: we complete one another. We would be much happier if those bureaucrats and laymen understood that our successes today are tomorrow’s FDA protocols.

Imagine what it was like in England in 1800. Almost everyone contracted smallpox and a fifth of them died of the disease. Worse still, those who were “variolated” (inoculated with smallpox as a preventative) also died of the disease. What hope would you have in that environment?

Edward Jenner inoculated people with cowpox in order to protect them from smallpox. He did this in spite of dire warnings from the Anti-Vaccination Society that his technique would produce “cowlike appendages” in his victims. Although the technique was known as early as 1765, and despite an utter lack of adverse events in Jenner’s experiments, it wasn’t until 1840 that the British equivalent of the FDA completely accepted “vaccination” (inoculation with cowpox) as a safe and effective means of suppressing smallpox.

ProgenCell’s work has paralleled Jenner’s in several ways. Like Jenner, we work with well-established discoveries. Like Jenner, we work with governmental regulatory agencies in getting our protocols accepted generally. And like Jenner, we have never had an adverse event from our work.

For those who lived in smallpox areas during Jenner’s day, it made sense to get vaccinated. For those who suffer from untreatable conditions today, it makes sense to look into autologous stem cell therapy. Find out what ProgenCell can do for your untreatable condition. Contact us today without obligation.

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